Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/15/2017

The proportion of workers who are female is significantly higher at big banks than at large tech companies, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission figures show. Banks such as JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America have large retail segments that employ many women, whereas the workforces of companies such as Google and Microsoft consist largely of programmers, most of whom are men.

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Quartz
8/15/2017

A federal appeals court in Chicago has slashed $2 million off the legal fees owed by Sears and Whirlpool in a class-action lawsuit over faulty washing machines. The $4.7 million in fees was reduced to $2.7 million, with the court deeming the multiplier of 1.75 times the base fees unjustified for a case that lacked complexity.

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Reuters
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Sears, Whirlpool
8/15/2017

Mentors from companies including Johnson & Johnson and Accenture participated in a program that matches them with female business leaders from countries such as Poland and Zimbabwe. "This program is about women's leadership, and we search the world for women with a daring vision -- women we believe in the next decade are poised to make extraordinary change," said Alyse Nelson, CEO of Vital Voices, a nonprofit that helps to run parts of the program.

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Fortune
8/15/2017

Demand for gender lens investing -- a strategy that uses capital to elevate women and girls -- has grown over the years. "People are seeing the opportunity that is out there to invest and back high-tech, high-growth women entrepreneurs or fund managers who are developing funds around women's access to capital or around smart business that has women in leadership," said Suzanne Biegel of the Wharton Social Impact Initiative.

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Knowledge@Wharton
8/15/2017

Women between the ages of 55 and 64 account for a significant percentage of the country's long-term unemployment, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It's time to address ageism in the economy, Sally Koslow writes, and for managers to "think about hiring women the age of their mother."

8/15/2017

The business world continues to present obstacles to the success of working mothers, who face a "motherhood penalty" in the form of lowered income, research has shown. Companies can take several steps to address the issue, including offering paid leave or providing child care options in the office, Alessandra Malito writes.

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MarketWatch
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Alessandra Malito
8/15/2017

Diversity is key for fueling the kind of innovation that leads to long-term market growth, writes Geri Stengel, president of Ventureneer. A number of tools are now available to help companies make more diverse hiring decisions and expand the range of suppliers that they work with, she notes.

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Forbes
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Geri Stengel
8/14/2017

To find out who you are as a leader, ask yourself what you do well, which areas you need help with and how you can better help your team, says John Baldoni in this blog post and video. "Make sure there's an alignment between what you think you're doing and what they are receiving," he says.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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John Baldoni
8/14/2017

Low morale is a symptom of a larger company problem and is not something that can be improved by itself, writes Ken Goldstein. Look at a company's processes and outcomes -- if either are poor, then morale is likely to follow.

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CorporateIntel
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Ken Goldstein
8/14/2017

People are often the reason projects fail rather than poor concepts, write Vip Vyas and Diego Nannicini. For example, the explosion at the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig "was a combination of arrogance and overconfidence" that led officials to discount safety, they write.

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INSEAD Knowledge
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Deepwater Horizon