STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/27/2017

Georgia high-school students who are part of a school automotive program will auction off for a third time a Mustang they restored after the winning bidders at two previous auctions returned the cars and donated the money to the program. Robert Harris, director of the 200-student program, said the support for career and technical education was "mind-blowing."

6/27/2017

Students in the Indianapolis Public Schools will be able to enroll in one of seven new career-themed academy programs in the 2018-19 school year. The academies are to be focused on health and sciences, manufacturing, teaching and construction, among others, and will allow students to work on career-themed projects and get experience in the field.

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Indianapolis Public Schools
6/27/2017

A rising high-school senior in Vermont used his engineering skills to build a scooter for a young girl with disabilities out of a Power Wheels toy. The school's robotics and engineering teacher said other students now are working on projects to assist other children with disabilities.

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ABC News
6/27/2017

Efforts are underway in a North Carolina school district to close the skills gap, asserts Kenneth Scott, director of career and technical education for Rockingham County Schools. The district has adopted a career-readiness test, and the local community college plans to add courses in welding based on requests from area employers, among other things.

6/27/2017

House finches use cigarette butts to fight parasites trying to invade their nests, but the practice may have some negative side effects for the birds, according to findings published in the Journal of Avian Biology. Researchers found that when they introduced live ticks into nests, the finches brought butts in to drive them away, but the scientists later found genetic damage in the birds from exposure to the butts after examining their red blood cells.

6/27/2017

Water exists in two separate forms with different densities, high and low, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "The new results give very strong support to a picture where water at room temperature can't decide in which of the two forms it should be, high or low density, which results in local fluctuations between the two," said Stockholm University's Lars Pettersson, co-author of the study.

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LiveScience
6/27/2017

Monkeys in the Amazon rainforest of Peru appear to use mud in their diets to help prevent stomach problems, a study published in the journal Primates suggests. Researchers observed Rylands' bald-faced saki monkeys eating mud from termite mounds, which has a high clay and carbon content that can absorb plant toxins.

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Peru, Rylands, Amazon
6/27/2017

Caves with unique acoustic properties may have attracted rock artists in ancient European farming communities, according to a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Researchers tested the acoustics at sites in France and Italy where paintings date back between 6,500 and 5,000 years and appear in just a few of the many caves.

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Science News
6/27/2017

The rate of carbon in the atmosphere is continuing to grow even though human carbon dioxide output has slowed, and scientists aren't sure why. Many researchers are concerned that Earth's natural sponges may have been altered by the enormous amounts of carbon they've been absorbing over the years, while others think recent El Nino climate patterns may be involved; however, funding for studies to determine the cause is limited.

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carbon dioxide, El Nino
6/27/2017

Researchers used drug absorption modeling to identify a narrow dosing target range for the use of maternal magnesium at the time of preterm deliveries to reduce the risk of cerebral palsy, according to a study in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. The study found a maternal serum magnesium target range of between 3.7 and 4.4 mg/dL enables neuroprotection.