Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/14/2017

The Immunization Integration Program, an alternative testing and recognition program for EHRs developed by HIMSS, Chickasaw Health Consulting and ICSA Labs with support from the CDC, aims to integrate vaccination data with patients' EHRs to help reduce the administrative burden associated with charting immunizations. Collaborators hope the program will improve vaccine coverage and compliance and clinical practice related to immunizations, according to Joyce Sensmeier, vice president of informatics at HIMSS.

12/14/2017

The teamplay Cardio dashboard application was unveiled by Siemens Healthineers within the Digital Ecosystem platform. The application provides insight into the cardiology department's resources, performance and status by analyzing data from non-DICOM and DICOM sources.

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Siemens Healthineers
12/14/2017

An undisclosed number of individuals were affected by a ransomware attack against the National Capital Poison Center in Washington, D.C., in October. An investigation found that an unauthorized third party accessed the center's database server, which contained caller names, names of those possibly exposed to a poisonous substance, information on exposures, medical record numbers, recommendations given to the caller and other information.

12/14/2017

An unauthorized user accessed the personal information of 47,000 clients of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services, including names, dates of birth, addresses and Social Security numbers. Officials did not find evidence that any data was downloaded from the computer server at Carl Albert State College in Poteau, Okla., where a computer that had been used in a state assessment was accessed in April 2016.

12/14/2017

The Department of Defense named Essye Miller as its acting CIO, replacing John Zangardi, who was tapped as CIO at the Department of Homeland Security in October. Miller will also continue serving as the agency's deputy CIO for cybersecurity.

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Federal News Radio
12/14/2017

The World Privacy Forum's "The Geography of Medical Identity Theft" report showed that the high number of medical identity theft complaints in states such as California, Texas, Florida and New York could be due to higher populations there. The report also found trends of aggressive debt collection and a regional medical identity theft hotspot including a number of Southeastern states.

12/14/2017

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to repeal net neutrality and remove the ban on paid prioritization may prompt slower traffic in telemedicine, which could especially affect trauma and emergency care providers who need quick access to data, said Mark Gaynor of St. Louis University. The American Academy of Pediatrics expressed opposition to allowing paid fast lanes, which could result in higher fees, slower access to medical records and delays in care.

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Healthcare IT News
12/14/2017

New York-Presbyterian is collaborating with Walgreens to offer its NYP OnDemand telemedicine kiosks at some Duane Reade drugstores in New York, enabling patients to access certified Weill Cornell emergency medicine physicians via high-definition video conferences. More kiosks are expected to open, and ColumbiaDoctors physicians are expected to begin participating next year.

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HIT Consultant
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Walgreens, Duane Reade
12/13/2017

Seventy-eight percent of IT professionals at health care provider organizations said they experienced a malware or ransomware attack in the previous 12 months, with 43% of larger organizations experiencing 16 or more attacks, according to a HIMSS Analytics/Mimecast survey. Researchers found that cybersecurity incidents are most likely to be caused by email, and 87% of respondents expect an increase or a significant increase in security threats related to email in the future.

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Health IT Security
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HIMSS
12/13/2017

Two University of Rochester neuroscientists reported in Neuron that they introduced information directly into two monkeys' premotor cortex, and the research could lead to a way to mitigate brain damage caused by stroke. The scientists implanted small electrode arrays into the brains of the monkeys, which had been taught to play a game involving visual cues, and the animals performed the functions as well using only signals transmitted by the electrodes as they did when prompted visually.