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5/22/2017

Hyperthyroidism, now common in domestic cats, was unheard of in felines until the late 1970s, when veterinarian Mark Peterson noticed similarities between a patient's symptoms and the signs of hyperthyroidism in humans. Veterinarians around the world began to diagnose the condition in cats while research was beginning to link the condition to fire retardants known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Because humans and cats live side by side, scientists are increasingly concerned that the feline disorder is a harbinger of a threat to human health, too.

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hyperthyroidism
5/22/2017

San Diego Zoo veterinarians are making changes to their patients' diets to help endangered white rhinos have healthy pregnancies and deliveries in captivity. Scientists found that phytoestrogens in the rhinos' soy and alfalfa feed may have been interfering with fertility, so they removed the compounds from the animals' diets, and since 2014, three rhinos that previously could not successfully reproduce have done so.

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Times of San Diego
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San Diego Zoo
5/22/2017

Swedish researchers found that 5 of 578 adults with type 2 diabetes had confirmed primary aldosteronism, all of whom were men and taking one or more antihypertensive medications. The findings in Clinical Endocrinology revealed that those with primary aldosteronism had lower potassium levels and higher systolic blood pressure than those without adrenal dysfunction.

5/22/2017

A study in Diabetes Care showed that each 5 µg/mL decrease in 1,5-anhydroglucitol level was associated with an increased estimated risk of dementia among diabetes patients. Researchers evaluated almost 13,000 patients with diabetes from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and found that among those with an A1C level of less than 7%, those with glucose peaks had a 0.19 greater z score decline over 20 years for cognitive decline, compared with those without glucose peaks.

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Diabetes Care, diabetes
5/22/2017

The number of K-12 students with diabetes increased from 83 in 2011 to 128 in the current school year in schools in Sarasota County, Fla., according to data from the Florida Department of Health. The increase has put a strain on school health services, said Suzanne DuBose, a registered nurse and supervisor of health services in Sarasota County schools.

5/22/2017

An analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed a significant association between low serum testosterone levels in women and high risk of stress and mixed incontinence. The findings, presented at the American Urological Association's annual meeting, indicate that testosterone replacement therapy could help prevent pelvic floor atrophy and reduce the risk of urinary incontinence, researcher Michelle Kim said.

5/22/2017

Abon Pharmaceuticals' clofarabine injection was approved by the FDA for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in previously treated pediatric patients ages 21 and younger.

5/22/2017

Research suggests people who eat most of their calories earlier in the day may have better diet success, and registered dietitian Tamara Duker Freuman said the practice of eating in sync with circadian rhythms can increase satiety and reduce eating at night. Freuman said circadian rhythms are associated with variations in hormone and enzyme levels and glucose transporters during the day that can affect metabolism.

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CNN
5/22/2017

Registered dietitians said Oscar Mayer's pledge to offer healthier hot dogs without artificial preservatives and byproducts or added nitrites and nitrates may be a step in the right direction, but RD Katie Ferraro added a hot dog still should be considered a "sometimes" food. RD Kristin Kirkpatrick said she would not describe any processed meat as healthy and recommended choosing more natural foods.

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Healthline
5/22/2017

Study data suggest consuming full-fat dairy, instead of lower-fat dairy products, does not increase cardiovascular or mortality risks, and registered dietitian Alissa Rumsey says it may keep people full longer so they eat less overall. But Rumsey cautions against adding more fat to a diet already high in saturated fats, red meat or animal fats.

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CBS News
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Alissa Rumsey