News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/19/2018

President Donald Trump and Congress must take action to reduce gun violence as a public health threat, the AAFP and four other physician groups said following the shooting deaths of 17 children and adults at a Parkland, Fla., high school. The groups called for labeling violence linked to gun use a national public health epidemic, funding appropriate research, and developing constitutionally appropriate restrictions on certain large-capacity magazines and firearms.

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AAFP News
2/19/2018

The Nevada Department of Health warned that a colony of nearly 800 feral rabbits at the Division of Child & Family Services' main campus in Las Vegas pose a health hazard, and people should avoid contact with the rabbits as well as grass and soil at the campus. The high concentration of rabbits could cause an outbreak of salmonellosis or tularemia, department officials said, and they warned against providing food and water to the animals.

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salmonellosis, tularemia
2/19/2018

A study in Diabetes Care showed that patients with takotsubo syndrome and diabetes had a higher mortality rate and a higher prevalence of hypertension and physical triggers than those without diabetes. German researchers used a cohort of 826 adults with takotsubo syndrome with and without diabetes, mean age of 72, and found that those with diabetes had more severely impaired left ventricular ejection fraction due to typical apical ballooning, a longer hospital stay and a higher pulmonary edema rate, compared with patients without diabetes.

2/19/2018

Preschoolers who underwent cardiac surgery as babies were 20 times more likely to develop hearing loss compared with the general population, with confirmed genetic anomaly, gestational age younger than 37 weeks and longer postoperative length of stay being possible risk factors, according to a study in the Journal of Pediatrics. Researchers also found worse language skills, lower IQ test scores, and reduced executive function and attention among those with hearing loss.

2/19/2018

Researchers who used F-18 FDG-PET/CT found that patients with psoriasis who received the drug Stelara, or ustekinumab, had a 19% relative improvement in aortic vascular inflammation, compared with those who received a placebo. The findings, presented at the American Academy of Dermatology's annual meeting, suggest that ustekinumab may lower the likelihood of future heart attacks and strokes, said researcher Dr. Joel Gelfand.

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ScienceDaily
2/19/2018

Increases in fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance were associated with weight gain over 10 years, according to a study in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews. Researcher Nicholas Pennings said clinicians should help patients reduce consumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates, which increase insulin release, and promote exercise and activities that improve insulin sensitivity.

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diabetes
2/19/2018

Diabetes educators need to be a voice for patients with diabetes and an advocate on their behalf in a rapidly changing health care system, said registered dietitian Donna Ryan, president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. The association's goals for 2018 include focusing on technology, reaching out to people in underserved areas, and finding new ways to support patients with diabetes.

2/19/2018

Dietitians and nutritionists say their favorite snacks at work include yogurt, almonds, tuna, fruit and cheese, and soup. Registered dietitian Angel Planells says a can of tuna in oil and five to seven low-sodium crackers are a great blend of carbohydrates, protein and fat.

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CNN
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Angel Planells
2/19/2018

Grocery stores can offer dinnertime solutions, including online grocery delivery and meal kits, that help busy families prepare easy, affordable and healthy meals at home, said registered dietitian Molly Hembree. Store dietitians and chefs can help by providing nutrition and cooking demonstrations and classes and dinner guides.

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Progressive Grocer
2/19/2018

A study in the American Journal of Hypertension linked eating two or more servings of yogurt per week to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease among adults with hypertension. Researchers found a 17% reduced risk of myocardial infarction and stroke among women and a 21% lower risk among men, compared with people who consumed less than one serving of yogurt per month.

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Tech Times