News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/15/2017

Researchers linked every 10 mg per deciliter increase in maternal blood glucose levels during pregnancy to an 8% higher likelihood of having infants with cardiac malformations, even after adjusting for maternal age, pre-existing maternal diabetes and prepregnancy body mass index. The findings in the Journal of Pediatrics were based on data involving 19,107 mother-child pairs.

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blood glucose, body mass index
12/15/2017

Adults who were vitamin D insufficient or deficient had a higher risk of heart failure, compared with those who had normal levels, researchers reported in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases. People with vitamin D deficiency also had a higher risk of hospitalization.

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vitamin D, vitamin D deficiency
12/15/2017

A study published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology associated the consumption of hot tea at least six times per week with a 74% lower risk of glaucoma, compared with not drinking hot tea. Researchers noted, however, that other lifestyle behaviors could factor into the risk.

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HealthDay News
12/15/2017

Vigorous exercise for five or more days per week increased the risk of age-related macular degeneration by 54% for men but not for women, an observational study in JAMA Ophthalmology found. Researchers suggested that high levels of exercise may affect the eye's choroid, a vascular membrane around the retina.

12/15/2017

School breakfast program participation in New Jersey decreased by 2% this year, and Cecilia Zalkind of Advocates for Children of New Jersey said some schools are backing away from breakfast in the classroom programs because they believe they are too difficult to provide. Zalkind says food service directors in districts that have successful breakfast programs can share their experiences with directors in districts that are not offering breakfast and help solve problems.

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New Jersey
12/15/2017

A host of agencies administering most federal spending on youth still lack permanent directors -- some because President Donald Trump hasn't nominated anyone and others because Congress hasn't confirmed nominees. The vacancies include high-level spots at the Office of Justice Programs and the Administration for Children and Families.

12/15/2017

Maine's juvenile justice system needs a full reassessment, an outside review panel concluded after examining the state's only youth correctional facility.
The Center for Children's Law and Policy said too many young people with mental health conditions are housed in at the facility, which it said is chronically understaffed and ill-equipped to serve them.

12/15/2017

Facing long patient waiting lists, West Virginia mental health providers are hesitant to sign on to a program where police send minor offenders with addictions to treatment rather than jail. The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion initiative has had success in Charleston, but efforts to expand it have run into a statewide shortage of mental health professionals.

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Stateline
12/15/2017

The US Department of Education is seeking public feedback on its proposal to delay the implementation of a rule that requires districts to consider racial or ethnic disparities in special education. The department is seeking the two-year delay to give it time to consider the elimination of the rule, which was set to take effect in the 2018-19 school year.

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US Department of Education
12/15/2017

Maine should immediately expand drug treatment and give priority to children, the uninsured and the incarcerated, a task force on the opioid epidemic says. State lawmakers may vote on opioid-related bills next month.